The Blog is named Random Thoughts after all…

Don’t you hate it when you can’t tell if you have a cold or allergies?

Blogging isn’t nearly as much fun when you have to write for work about a subject you’re not terribly excited about. It’s also no cake walk when you want to put something on your own blog but also want to submit it to a blog where you guest write on occasion.

When you’re having a heated debate on Facebook, it’s not very productive to play grammar police with the other person. Unless you are just trying to make them angry…

Why does your boss always want something big right at the end of the day when you’re anxious to leave, but totally ignores you when your evening is free?

Why does your brain leave the building when you have a new relationship?

Don’t you hate it when you’ve just gotten comfortable then you realize you need to use the restroom?

Have you ever had so many thoughts you wanted to share that you knew your Facebook friends would think you were nuts so you wrote a blog post about a bunch of random thoughts?

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What am I doing here?

This week I had my first experience as part of the creative team for a community theater production. I joined the table read (just what it sounds like) of a play that was just cast. A few times I helped by reading stage directions, but I am not particularly cut out for that sort of thing.

I am looking forward to this challenge, but at the same time I am a little intimidated. This is the first time that so much of the lighting design has been my responsibility. I have a co-designer, who is also the stage manager, but her help will mostly be hanging and focusing the light fixtures.

The talented cast jumped right into character with no prompting from the director. Soon we were all laughing. I decided I need to watch several rehearsals. Not only do I need to observe blocking and other details important to light design, but I need to be able to watch the show without falling out of my chair laughing. I am also running sound and lights when the show is performed.

I can’t wait to get into the meat of this project. I will be challenged and maybe a bit overwhelmed, but mostly grateful for the chance to stretch my creative wings.

Any tips or suggestions will be gratefully accepted.

Chemo times 2

Some of you have asked about my kids being on chemo. They don’t have cancer, they have juvenile arthritis. JA can cause excruciating pain and deformalities, steal childhoods, bankrupt families, destroy marriages, cause blindness, and even kill. Although for different reasons, the difficulties my family has faced are not unlike the problems of cancer families, but without the public awareness.

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The public’s knowledge and perception of cancer and juvenile arthritis is a touchy subject for the JA community. We know that arthritis can be just as life altering, if not as deadly, as cancer. We also know the general population is not aware of the similarities. It is hard to educate without sounding like whiny, self absorbed divas who want special treatment for their kids.

While both diseases have periods of remission and risk of recurrence, one way or another cancer treatment usually has an end. For many JA patients, treatment is a never ending battle. I have heard heartbreaking stories of JA children who shared infusion rooms with cancer patients and constantly asked their parents when it would be their turn to ring the bell announcing the end of their treatment. For them there is no end.

The mortality rate for cancer is definitely higher. I am thankful that I have not watched my child deteriorate, knowing there would be no recovery. My heart aches for parents who have lost a child. Even in remission, recurrence is a continuing threat. Parents of JA kids in remission have that same fear.

A friend of mine shared recently that her daughter was in remission. I joked that she was asking for trouble. A few days later she was back at the hospital. I felt bad, like it was somehow my fault, though I knew it wasn’t. That friend doesn’t blame me, but the pain is still there. JA parents hurt when one of “our” kids suffers, and we rejoice together on good days.

I won’t pretend to understand what it is like to have a child with cancer. But I do know what it is like to have a child in ICU, their sibling wondering whether they will recover. Both my kids have lived that hell on earth.

December

The weather was nice today. Like 75 degrees. On December 11.  It’s hard to remember Christmas is 2 weeks away when I don’t even need long sleeves and the thermostat in the car wants to turn on the air conditioner (although my friends in Australia would think it is chilly for this time of year.)

It’s easy to remember it’s December when I look at my calendar. On top of my regular work, medical appointments and handbell rehearsals, I am running lights and sound for a Christmas play, have a couple extra tech shifts at the church for special programs, and am playing in the handbell choir for 2 services on Christmas Eve. Whew!

If you are anything like me (and half the general population) it’s easy to meet yourself coming and going in December. I (and the aforementioned general population) also have to consciously carve out time for prayer, relaxation, meditation, or whatever you to do keep yourself centered and sane.

No matter what keeps you busy this time of year, make sure to spend quality time with those you love, and to take that time for yourself. Don’t get so caught up in the busy-ness of the shopping, decorating , cooking and celebrating that you find yourself exhausted before the holiday arrives.

Well, the play is starting. Catch you later. After some quiet time.